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HISTORY

The Cozy Cabins property has been in use since the mid 1800’s. While the original settlers are not known, some of their remnants still connect us to their past. The old cabin which is currently known as the ‘Chicken Coop’ has housed various forms of livestock for over 100 years. The barn as well, while being built in the 80’s, uses lumber re-purposed from existing outbuildings that dated back over a century.

In 1958 the property was purchased by 2 hunter/trappers, Jules Lamoth and Max Torent. These two were known for their rugged lifestyle, big personalities and love of hunting. Jules was once reported missing by his logging foreman, the employer stating, “His saw was still in the tree, his tools on the ground and it was as if he just vanished.” Adding to the mystery was the simultaneous disappearance of a neighbouring horse. When the RCMP finally caught up with Jules, he was on his way down out of the mountains with a huge elk strapped to the back of the horse, explaining “I saw that Elk run by me and I couldn’t just let it go. I only needed to borrowed the horse for a few days.”

Adding to their mischievous ways was the story of how the original Cozy Cabin property was purchased. Having been cheated out of a portion of logging wages, Jules and Max went to a prime piece of land their employer owned and logged the entire area in secret, as quickly as they could. They then sold the timber to a nearby mill and used the proceeds to purchase the same land at a price their employer couldn’t resist. The original parcel was 160 acres and was purchased for the prime price of $800.

Jules and Max spent most of their time logging in camps around BC, but would return during break-up to trap in the area. Later there was a third man who came to live with the 2 bachelors named Jean-Paul Gosling, also an avid logger and trapper.

After a number of years, Max Torent passed away and Jules worked to buy out his share of the land from Max’s family, leaving Jules the sole owner. Jules continued to live and work in the area, hunting and trapping as often as time allowed.

One fateful day Jules was guiding a bear hunting trip and met a wealthy german client named Hildagard who harboured a suppressed love for the wild. Although they were separated by almost 20 years there was a connection between the two. Within a year Hilda had moved onto the property and the shack that Jules called home.

HISTORY

The Cozy Cabins property has been in use since the mid 1800’s. While the original settlers are not known, some of their remnants still connect us to their past. The old cabin which is currently known as the ‘Chicken Coop’ has housed various forms of livestock for over 100 years. The barn as well, while being built in the 80’s, uses lumber re-purposed from existing outbuildings that dated back over a century.

In 1958 the property was purchased by 2 hunter/trappers, Jules Lamoth and Max Torent. These two were known for their rugged lifestyle, big personalities and love of hunting. Jules was once reported missing by his logging foreman, the employer stating, “His saw was still in the tree, his tools on the ground and it was as if he just vanished.” Adding to the mystery was the simultaneous disappearance of a neighbouring horse. When the RCMP finally caught up with Jules, he was on his way down out of the mountains with a huge elk strapped to the back of the horse, explaining “I saw that Elk run by me and I couldn’t just let it go. I only needed to borrowed the horse for a few days.”

With what can only be described as the touch of a very determined woman, Hilda began transforming the property into the gem it is today. Whereas before she had led a more relaxed life, Hilda was now faced with the challenges of living in the Canadian wild with an eccentric frenchman. Hilda began to get involved in all aspects of country life from logging to chicken raising. With the finances she brought into the project she convinced Jules to begin upgrading the ‘shack’ to the timber frame house that sits on the property today. The entire house was constructed from trees on the property, with some of the beams being so long that they had to be freehand cut with a chainsaw rather than put through a mill. Much of the work on the house was done by Jules and his lifelong friend Jeneu Urcullu. One other man involved in the project was a proficient builder named Reynold Mazu. The ‘shack’ that Jules had lived in for so many years now serves as the living room in the completed house. The living room still has the original fireplace with baking ovens built into it from its pioneer days.

Work began of the first cabin shortly after the completion of the house. This cabin was built as a ‘guest cabin’ for visiting family. Because it was only used for family for short periods, Jules and Hilda decided to try renting it out. The cabin was so popular that they decided this might be a business venture. So they named the first cabin the Deer cabin and constructed a second cabin, calling it the Bear Cabin.
The setting and the quaint cabins brought many referrals and so Jules and Hilda built 3 more cabins, one after the other, the Beaver, Moose and Elk.
The couple was close to completing construction on the Elk cabin when a series of strokes left Jules unable to continue work or maintain the property.
At this point the decision was made to put the property up for sale and through a series of events, the Hatterscheidt family took over in the spring of 1997. Harald, Kim and their children then spent the next 20 years working very hard to upgrade and build up the resort to where it is today. The Hatterscheidts remain the current owners, now welcoming guests from all over the world.

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